The Chantry

The Chantry house in Greenwich has its origins as a conduit building, normally a structure built over the end of a water conduit or spring. The building originally dates from 1515, where it was part of the Tudor Palace and an extension to the Royal Palace of Placentia. The Palace was demolished in the seventeenth […]

The Chantry house in Greenwich has its origins as a conduit building, normally a structure built over the end of a water conduit or spring.

The building originally dates from 1515, where it was part of the Tudor Palace and an extension to the Royal Palace of Placentia.

The Palace was demolished in the seventeenth century and replaced with the Greenwich Hospital (now The Old Royal Naval College).

The Chantry is one of the few remaining structures that has claim to some of its original construction of the former Palace.

In 1807 the property was acquired by the Royal Naval Asylum and enlarged to the designs of Daniel Asher Alexander as a house for the Asylum’s Auditor.

Although not publicly accessible as the building is now private residential housing, the facade of the building still echoes its Tudor past with the royal crest and period brickwork. 

Open Hours

Not accessible

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *